Star Jelly: Meteoric Deposit or Something Else?

Star Jelly
Star Jelly
Bj.shoenmakers
Star Jelly is a term used to describe a strange opaque jelly-like substance that people have been claiming falls to Earth during meteor showers for hundreds of years. The substance is apparently very real and it does seem to fall from the sky, though there is not any concrete evidence of this. It is weird enough, in and of itself, but some of the theories of its origins and the lack of scientific knowledge regarding Star Jelly make the substance even weirder.

Star Jelly is described as opaque or gray in color. It is said to be like a gelatin mold. Mounds of star jelly that are up to several feet in diameter or length have been discovered. Blobs of it have been found in trees, on top of cars, on the ground and more. Scotland and the UK seem to be popular sites for the dispersion of Star Jelly, though it has been found in Australia and the United States as well.

Scientists at the Macaulay Institute in the United Kingdom examined some Star Jelly and concluded that it is 99% water. The other 1% is anyone's guess. It has also been discovered that, while there are bits of microscopic life on the Star Jelly that came from the environment it was found in, the Star Jelly itself is neither plant nor animal. No DNA can be found that appears to belong to the Star Jelly itself. This puts to rest many theories that have sprung up regarding this strange material.

It has been postulated that Star Jelly is merely frogspawn or stag semen. If the size of some bits of Star Jelly were not enough to make it obvious that this is not the case. The fact that there was no DNA in the samples tested proves it. It has also been suggested that it is biological matter from somewhere in outer space. This is obviously not the case either. Star Jelly is not a life form, nor was it biologically created by one.

Skeptics cling to the idea that Star Jelly is some sort of mold, naturally occurring slime, bacteria or lichen. The recent tests done on Star Jelly prove this wrong. The only way these theories could be true is if the tests were incorrect, which is always a possibility. Well, there is the possibility that it is a hoax as well.

The meteorite theory regarding Star Jelly that has existed so long is highly unlikely, even though the substance is so strange. It is certain that objects from space do make it through the Earth's atmosphere; however, living objects or objects that have such a delicate structure cannot feasibly withstand the journey. The Earth's atmosphere is capable of turning a mass of stone and metal into nothing but particles. Grandma's gelatin mold does not stand a chance. Star Jelly would have to be like no other substance we have ever seen to be able to do that. Frankly, nothing scientists have ascertained about it suggests that it could withstand the fall to Earth. There goes the meteorite theory.

The fact of the matter is that, right now, we do not know what Star Jelly is, but we do know what it is not - for the most part. Without further study and more instances of this stuff (Hopefully, not falling on our heads.), we cannot say much more about it. For now, it will have to remain a mystery, but a most likely Earthly one.

Sources

Anissimar, Michael, retrieved 11/5/10, What is Star Jelly?, wisegeek.com/what-is-star-jelly.htm

Reid, Melanie, Nature 1 Science 0 as finest minds fail to explain star jelly, retrieved 11/5/10, timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/scotland/article6840730


ufosleuth, Star Jelly - What on Earth is it?, retrieved 11/5/10, highstrangeness.net/index.php/ufos-news/129-starjelly